Almeida Theatre takes Our Town performances and project into London schools

The Almeida Theatre is taking the full production of one of its latest shows, Our Town, into two London secondary schools this November, reaching 500 students.

Our Town 1-715 Laura Elsworthy, David Walmsley and Jessica Lester by Marc Brenner

Laura Elsworthy, David Walmsley and Jessica Lester in Our Town (Credit: Marc Brenner)

The cast of the current run at the Almeida will perform at Dormers Wells High School in Ealing on 10 November and Cleeve Park School in Bexley on 17 November for students. Neither of the London boroughs housing the schools, Ealing and Bexley, has a professional theatre. Students attending performances will take part in pre-show workshops.

The performances will make up part of a wider six-week programme entitled ‘Your Town’, which will involve students telling stories of their own towns of Southall and Sidcup through exploring the idea of community and creating video content.

Almeida’s artistic director Rupert Goold said of the project: ‘The work that Almeida Projects does with schools and young people is enormously inspiring, and I am so glad that we are able to continue to find exciting ways to bring our work to more young people across London.’

For more information on the ‘Your Town’ project, visit www.almeida.co.uk/education/schools-and-education/your-town.

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Leicester Curve launches apprenticeship scheme

Leicester Curve has been awarded £240,000 to launch a three-year apprenticeship scheme. The Paul Hamlyn foundation and Esmee Fairbairn foundation donated money to help The Curve provide apprenticeships for 16-25 year olds living in the Leicestershire area.

Associate director of Leicester Curve,  Adel Al-Salloum said: ‘We are thrilled that our funders have recognised our current success in working in the community and the potential Curve has to develop its work with young and emerging artists. The project is about new ideas and how Curve supports young people to realise their ideas and turn them to enterprise.’

The programme aims to take on 30 young people and provide them with training as art entrepreneurs. They will participate in community projects, involving local schools and the elderly.

Practitioners and a programme manager are yet to be hired for the scheme. Applications for places opened in November, with training set to start in 2012. The apprentices will take their projects into the community in Spring 2012.

http://www.curveonline.co.uk