PERFORM TICKET GIVEAWAY!

At next month’s PERFORM 2015, Teaching Drama is hosting a workshop series for teachers on Saturday 14th featuring sessions with White Light, exam board representatives and Frantic Assembly.TD is giving away 25 one-day entry tickets to PERFORM for FREE! Each ticket admits two people.

The ticket, which costs £9 on the day, will give you access to the PERFORM exhibition, as well as the chance to attend a whole range of workshops and seminars, including TD’s workshop series. (It’s recommended that workshops are booked in advance; the entry fee for the TD workshops is £3 when pre-booked, and £4 on the day).

To enter our prize draw for a PERFORM one-day entry ticket, email teaching.drama@rhinegold.co.uk with the subject line ‘PERFORM 2015 – ticket giveaway’.

Good luck!

Perform

 

TD to host teacher workshop sessions at PERFORM 2015

Teaching Drama is delighted to announce that we’ll be partnering up with 2015’s PERFORM, which will be celebrating its fifth anniversary from 13–15 February 2015 at London Olympia. Each year PERFORM runs workshops and seminars for people involved or looking to build a career in the performing arts. 2015’s available sessions exceed 60 in number.

There’s a huge range of workshops  and seminars on off er at PERFORM

There’s a huge range of workshops
and seminars on offer at PERFORM

TD have worked with PERFORM to create the ‘Teaching Drama magazine workshop series’: a specially crafted programme for teachers which will run on the Saturday (14 February). The first of the three workshops, ‘Contemporary theatre practitioners’, will explore the methods of contemporary theatre companies for inclusion in KS4/5 study programmes to fulfil practitioner-inspired modules. The session will be led by a member of one of the UK’s most innovative physical theatre groups, Frantic Assembly.

The second session in the TD series, ‘Preparing students for written papers’, will be a teachers’ seminar with representatives from the leading exam boards – looking at what students need to do to meet assessment criteria in both written and performance exams at KS4 and 5.

For teachers looking to brush up their technical theatre skills, the third workshop will look at how to make the best use of a limited school lighting rig and what you can do to bring your productions to life with a member from leading entertainment lighting specialists White Light.

As well as TD’s workshop series for teachers, there are other sessions running throughout the three days for teachers, ran by the National Theatre, Trinity College London and Bodens College of Performing Arts. For full details of the programme, visit the PERFORM website.

All of the workshops, each costing £3 for admittance, are now open to book now at www.performshow.co.uk; limited spaces are available, so early booking is advised.

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Frantic Assembly, Lovesong Review

Here’s another chance to read our review from Autumn 2 of Frantic Assembly’s Lovesong.  In our forthcoming issue, out 20 December, we talk to the Frantic Assembly team about why education is so important to their company. Get your copy at http://www.pocketmags.com or subscribe at http://www.teaching-drama.co.uk.

Production review:  Frantic Assembly – Lovesong 

Star Rating * * * * (4/5)

Credit: Johan Persson

A slick, emotional journey charting a relationship heading towards a goodbye. More suitable for KS5.

Frantic Assembly take a slightly slower and more sentimental pace than their usual work with Lovesong. The production looks at the life of a relationship from either end, as a pair of younger and a pair of older actors co-habit the same space. We hear their changing conversations from initial excitement, to growing tension and later a sad, foreboding sense of looming loss, as Maggie grows frail with a worsening illness, the sentiment of the tag-line becomes more and more apparent: ‘That is the story of our beginning. And this is the story of…the end’.

The parallel couples share the house as the same kitchen and bedroom walls surround their voices as they grow old together. Theatrically, we dart back and forth through time and the slick direction allows the action to move seamlessly across the decades. At one stage, the older Maggie leans into the wardrobe and remerges played by her younger counterpart. There are brief, wonderful moments where the older characters become aware of their younger selves for a fleeting instant and vice versa, moments which hinge the scenes more and more frequently as the piece develops. Engaging and fluid physical sections, a trademark of Frantic Assembly’s style, move time forward and explore the shifts in the relationship in a beautiful and moving manner. The most memorable saw all four performers disappearing and re-emerging, accompanied by rhythmic music and powerful drum beats which gradually gave way to the sound of Maggie crying, her sobs bringing us back to the reality of her physical pain.

The design of the show and its aesthetic congruence, for me, even outdoes these dignified and integrative performances. The jade green, sky blue and mustard set and costumes were authentic and retrospective. Large, wallpapered, oblong pillars, set at angles at the back of the set were the walls of the rooms of the house and acted as a cyclorama for well-designed and evocative video projection. This allowed imagery and symbolism within Abi Morgan’s text to rise to the surface. The relationship between the performers and these images was exquisite, at one stage, the old man clutches the air as if trying to grab onto one of a flock of starlings that frequently passes over the set and at another, one of the characters touches her kitchen wall as sparks of light radiate from her fingertips to fill the whole space. The production triumphed in its painting of stage pictures that stay with you after leaving the theatre: the older Billy and Maggie sat at the kitchen table, the younger William and Margaret sat on the floor against their bed, surrounded by the heads of hundreds of flowers as the starlings cross the pillars once more.

At the time of going to print, the educational pack was not yet available. However, it can’t be far off and Frantic Assembly is renowned for good quality, accessible resources that are downloadable from their website. Seeing this show made me wish my students were with me. There was so much to get from this experience – a good discussion about the performances (frequently powerful and sensitive, and I’m sure that as they settle into the run and subsequent tour, they will overcome some verbal awkwardness evident on this opening night), an appreciation of how to use design elements in an harmonious way (in order to transport us in time and place and tug at our heartstrings) and an understanding of how a performer can use one’s body and its contact with others to communicate non-verbally. At the end of the performance, I wasn’t in tears as many other audience members were, but, nevertheless, felt touched by the story and the way in which it was told so eloquently.

Lovesong – directed by Scott Graham and Steven Hoggett
Frantic Assembly are touring until February 2012.
For more information and to book tickets: www.franticassembly.co.uk/productions/lovesong

by David Duthie.

David Duthie trained in drama and for his PGCE at University of Wales, Aberystwyth. He was the head of drama and performing arts in in Shropshire for six years. He is now the director at The SPACE in Somerset.

NEW issue of Teaching Drama: out now!

Hello all,

We have been busy putting together our latest issue – in this edition we have:

* Drama and Me with Simon Callow
(including an extract from his book)

* A review of Frantic Assembly’s’ Lovesong

* A guide to the MA courses on offer for teachers

And news, book reviews, my five favourite plays, toolkit and much more!

Head to: www.pocketmags.com and search for ‘teaching drama’ to buy your digital issue.
To subscribe to our print magazine and for schemes of work, head to: www.teaching-drama.co.uk