Over 50% of NQTs forecast to leave the profession within 12 months by 2017

Supply teaching agency Randstad Education has forecast that by 2017, 52% of newly qualified teachers will leave the profession within 12 months. Randstad Education’s estimate is based on trends of current statistics – of those qualified in 2011, 62% were still in the education sector a year after qualifying. In 2005, 80% of NQTs stayed in the teaching profession for 12 months or more.

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Jenny Rollinson, managing director of Randstad Education, said of the forecast: ‘There are plenty of problems that newly qualified teachers face – from government bureaucracy and curriculum changes to the pressure of league tables and problematic students – but being panicked into ducking out of the profession or taking on the wrong role shouldn’t be one of them. Newly qualified teachers need to find the right job for them. They should keep calm and examine all the options available to them – not just those that work well for their university’s league table results.’

Randstand Education are holding nationwide ‘open days’ on 12 May  offering advice to newly qualified teachers on applying for jobs; more information can be found at www.randstad.co.uk/jobs/s-education.

Opera and ballet performances added to Digital Theatre Plus

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The Royal Opera House’s La Traviata (Credit: Catherine Ashmore)

Digital Theatre Plus, the online arts education resource featuring full-length films of captured live productions as well as behind the scenes interviews and study guides, has released a new series of opera and ballet performances.

Six-full length Royal Opera House productions are now available to view: Le nozze di Figaro, La bohème, Eugene Onegin, La traviata, Hänsel und Gretel and Dido and Aeneas.

Fiona Lindsay, creative producer of Digital Theatre Plus said: ‘This is a very exciting time as we expand the variety of educational performing arts content available within the resource. Geographical location and economic status should not be a barrier to experiencing excellent arts education, and it’s fantastic that productions from the Royal Opera House will be seen in classrooms around the world’.

There are also productions of The Sleeping Beauty, Sylvia and Swan Lake available to watch from The Royal Ballet, as well as Sondheim’s Merrily We Roll Along from director Maria Friedman and Into the Woods at Regent’s Open Air Theatre.

Alastair Roberts, managing director of Royal Opera House Enterprises, said: ‘Providing acclaimed productions alongside an education platform is not only a great way to learn but also showcases the breadth of opportunity within the arts world with behind the scenes access.’

www.digitaltheatreplus.com

CULTURAL EDUCATION REPORT LEADS TO £15 MILLION INVESTMENT FROM GOVERNMENT

Recommendations have been made in order to improve the state of England’s cultural learning after a report, undertaken by Classic FM’s managing director Darren Henley, found that ‘patchiness in provision of cultural education [remains] across England’.

The report suggested that, to improve cultural learning, students should study arts subjects up until the age of 16. Henley has said that cultural education in England could become ‘the envy of the world’ if the government are to take his recommendations on board. The Department for Education have now confirmed that they will invest over £15 million over the next three years in order to develop Henley’s ideas.

The coalition government’s backing of the English Baccalaureate (EBacc), which includes no studying of arts subjects, has been cited as one of reasons behind the problems in cultural education. Henley has suggested that there should be a ‘creation of a sixth grouping of subjects included in the EBacc, which would include cultural education subjects such as art and design, dance, drama, design technology, film studies and music’.

It was revealed today that many of the report’s recommendations have already been set in motion. There are plans for an academy for student film-makers, headed by the British Film Institute, and the creation of a national youth dance company which will be funded by the DofE and the Arts Council.

Education secretary Michael Gove said: ‘Britain has forged a well-deserved reputation in popular culture – in film, dance, music and art. But I want to introduce more children to high culture. Cultural education must not be a closed shop for poorer students. I want to end any suggestion that high culture is only for the privileged few.’

For more information and to view the report in full, visit http://www.education.gov.uk