Specially priced performance of The Scottsboro Boys for low-income families

Mousetrap Theatre Projects and West End producer Paula Marie Black organised a family performance on 5 November of The Scottsboro Boys at the Garrick Theatre, London.

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The Scottsboro Boys runs at The Garrick Theatre, London (Credit: Johan Persson)

Those invited to attend were families who have previously taken part in Mousetrap’s Family First Nights (FFN) programme. FFN, which has been running for the last 17 years, runs a five-week summer programme where low-income families (identified by organisations such as social service agencies, housing associations, charities and community projects) can choose from 30 theatre productions in London and the West End with the support of Mousetrap. FFN participants are then invited to theatre, opera and dance events throughout the year.

The performance of The Scottsboro Boys had specially priced tickets, with children’s at £2.50–£5 and adults at £5–£10. The event sold out with 180 families in attendance. The performance time was moved to an earlier slot to 7.15pm to accommodate the needs of those with young children.

Susan Whiddington, director of Mousetrap Theatre Projects, said, ‘We are delighted to invite our families to this spectacular and very moving musical and are incredibly grateful to the generosity of Paula Marie Black for making it possible. We believe the electricity and the energy of this family audience will be inspirational to the actors and everyone involved in the production.’

Mousetrap win award for charity work

Mousetrap Theatre Projects has been awarded with the Sandford Award for Heritage Education – a first for any UK theatre organisation. The Sanford Award honours organisations for quality and excellence in their educational services and facilities at a heritage site – a prize which, until this year, had not been won by a theatre organisation. Previous winners have included the Tower of London and Edinburgh Castle.

Mousetrap specialise in providing young people with access to theatre performances in London. They work with children from disadvantaged areas and backgrounds, as well as children who have special needs and learning difficulties.

Director of Mousetrap, Susan Whiddington said: ‘We believe that theatre is a significant contributor to Britain’s cultural heritage and we are thrilled to be recognised for our part in bringing theatre to young people who would otherwise not have access to it.’

The theatre charity won for their overall work, but more specifically for their StageSeen programme: a theatre day which sees the company work with hard of hearing or deaf young people. The day includes participants taking part in a workshop with a deaf theatre facilitator, as well as providing the attendees with a BSL interpreted or captioned matinee performance of a production such as Billy Elliot.

Sandford Award judge Adam Clarke said: ‘Mousetrap’s work with hard to reach and seldom heard young people incorporates practice that could, and perhaps should, be transferred to all organisations and properties that deliver schools’ programmes. In enabling access to the West End stage, children are given access to a magical world that enables them to learn, create, socialise and grow.’

Chief executive of the Society of London Theatre, Julian Bird, offered his congratulations to Mousetrap, an organisation which they provided support to over the past six years: ‘To be the first theatre education organisation to be awarded a Sandford Award is an incredible accolade. I would like to congratulate Mousetrap for its instrumental work in introducing young people to the magic of theatre, irrespective of their cultural, social or economic background.’

www.mousetrap.org.uk