Green room: Are we training too many students?

shutterstock_128331149Drama training at universities and drama schools is a competitive business, with thousands of students auditioning each year for a limited number of spaces. But is there enough work out there for the students who are trained? In our Autumn 2 issue of TD (out now) we’re asking our Green room debaters:

 

Read the opinions of our panellists, in our latest issue – available to buy now as a digital copy (www.pocketmags.com) or you can subscribe to future issues at www.teaching-drama.co.uk.

 

Student Guide to Drama Education 2014-15

SGDE 2014-15 cover F01a.inddThe 2014-15 Student Guide to Drama Education is now available to view online for FREE.

Whether you are looking to study drama at university, drama school or perhaps even starting out in the industry – you’ll find this to be a helpful guide.

Features in this year’s guide include:

  • For anyone considering drama at higher education level, our ‘five in focus’ articles put five universities, five drama schools and five training alternatives under the spotlight
  • Expert advice on picking a career pathway
  • How to survive a drama school audition
  • A guide to higher education funding
  • How to find the perfect headshot photographer for you
  • A step-by-step guide to marketing an emerging theatre company
  • PLUS – interviews with people working in the industry

Read the guide at www.rhinegold.co.uk/sgde. Subscribers to Teaching Drama will receive the Student Guide to Drama Education with their Autumn 1 2014-15 issue.

 

University acceptance numbers fall

Ucas figures for the 2012 university cycle have revealed the impact of the rise in tuition fees. There were almost 54,000 fewer students beginning courses this year than there were in 2011. Students accepting places at universities in England dropped by 6.6%

Ucas chief executive Mary Curnock Cook said: ‘The headline numbers in this report signal the challenging environment for recruitment in 2012 for some parts of UK higher education.  However, the underlying findings are more subtle – for example, although demand for higher education has fallen in England, the actual entry rates for young people are close to trend.’

She also spoke of her concern that ‘women remain more likely to enter higher education than men’, with 257,000 women starting university this year, compared to 208,000 men. The chief executive described the trend as a ‘striking and worrying finding.’

Not all figures were in decline: acceptance rates in Wales went up by 5.3% and rates of entry for disadvantaged 18 year olds increased in the UK.

UCAS give top tips for writing a personal statement

UCAS have released their top tips for writing a personal statement. The advice comes as the application deadline to apply for higher education approaches. Sunday 15th January is the last day to apply to college or university for 2012.

Adviser Ross Sanger said: ‘My major tip is to show your ambitions and desires for wanting to do the course. Put across your passion in as much detail as possible. At the end of the day, you need to be doing something that you really like.’

The personal statement is the one of the trickiest parts of the application process. Visit http://www.ucas.com for more information.

UCAS’s top ten tips for writing a personal statement 

1. Express interest in the subject and show real passion

2. Strong opening line to grab the reader’s attention

3. Relate outside interests to the course

4. Think beyond university

5. Get the basics right

6. Don’t try to sound too clever

7. Take time and make it your best work

8. Don’t leave it until the last minute

9. Get a second opinion

10. Honesty is the best policy

Drama school students face 15% cut in higher education places

The Conservatoire for Dance and Drama (CDD) has warned applicants could face a cut of 15% in students accepted onto drama school courses, if government plans are to go ahead.

The government plans for there to be more competition in higher education. They propose that universities should compete for students who receive AAB and above at A level. This would affect the number of places given on the basis of auditions rather than qualifications.

CDD has raised its concerns in response to the governments plans, ‘because the conservatoire recruits on talent and potential rather than on formal qualifications, its AAB+ population will vary considerably year on year.’

If government plans do go ahead it could mean 15% fewer places for UK and EU students applying for drama school places. CDD maintains that they will strive to, ‘continue competing with the best in the world in the UK national interest, and to provide access to this training on the basis of talent alone.’